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Let’s Practice the Petit Battement

Hi!  Welcome to my blog.

 

I’m happy to see you.

 

Today we’re going to talk about the ballet step called “petit  battement”.

 

Below is the definition of this step from Vance’s Ballet Dictionary:

“An exercise for speed and agility in the lower leg. In the starting position, the working leg is sur le cou-de-pied. It opens in the direction of 2nd position but only half way, as the leg does not fully extend at the knee. The working leg then closes to sur le cou-de-pied opposite of where it started (in back if it started in front and vice versa). The knee and thigh stay in the same place and do not move during the process. “

 

Here is a drawing of how the step is done.

 

 

Maybe this video will help you better understand how the step is done when practiced at the barre:

 

After I practice my petit battement for a while, I’m going to color this picture.

 

 

 

 Ask your mom or dad to print it out for you.  I know you remembered to say “please” and “thank you”.

 

  

You can subscribe to my blog if you’d like and your mom and dad say it’s okay.  Just click on the “subscribe” button in the right-hand column near the top of the page and fill out the form.  You’ll get each new blog post right in your email inbox.

 

I hope you’ll come back to my blog next week when we’ll talk about more ballet steps.  See you then.

 

 

xoxoxo,

MilliMouse

 

 

(Millicent’s blog is sponsored by the Exercise Equipment Super Store and the Healing Tai Chi Store

 

 

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What is a Pas de Chat?

Hi!  Welcome back to my blog.

I’m happy to see you again.

Today we’re going to learn about the ballet step called “pas de chat”.

The term means “step of the cat”.   Cats…yuk!

Anyway, below is the definition of this step from Vance’s Ballet Dictionary:

“A jump. Leap off the left leg, starting from a plié and raising the right leg into retiré. In midair, raise the left leg into retiré, too, so your legs form a diamond shape in the air. Land on the right leg with the left leg still in retiré; then bring it down, landing in another plié. In the famous dance in Swan Lake in which the four cygnets dance with interlaced arms, they do sixteen pas de chat. “

pas de chat

Above is a drawing of the step by step movements of the pas de chat.

Below is a video showing each part of the pas de chat.  I think you’ll understand the step better after you watch it.

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-do-a-pas-de-chat

I’m going to try doing a pas de chat.

After I practice my new step, I’m going to ask my mom (or dad) to print out the picture below so I can color it.

Please click on the link below to open the picture:

http://national.ballet.ca/pdf/education/fourseasonsColouringSheet.pdf

I know you remembered to say “please” and “thank you”.

I hope you’ll come back next week when we’ll talk about more ballet steps.

See you then.

An article for your mom or dad:  

http://eauclaireschoolofdance.wordpress.com/2012/01/12/dance-shoe-reviews-top-5-best-tap-shoes/

You can subscribe to my blog if you’d like and your mom and dad say it’s okay.  Just click on the “subscribe” button in the right-hand column near the top of the page and fill out the form.  You’ll get each new blog post right in your email inbox.

xoxoxo,

MilliMouse

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What is a Fondu?

Hi!  Welcome back to my blog.

I hope you had a wonderful holiday.

Today we’re going to learn about the ballet term “fondu”.

Below is the definition of fondu from Vance’s Ballet Dictionary:

“Any movement that lowers the body by bending one leg. In a plié, both legs support the body; in a fondu, only one leg supports the body.”

Maybe it would help to see a picture of a dancer performing a fondu.  Look at the students below.

Does that help you to understand fondu better?

I found a video that explains this movement very well.  Click on the link to open the video.

video_2374569_do-fondu-ballet-dancing.html

Now, you try it.  It isn’t so hard, is it?

Below is a picture for us to color after we finish practicing the fondu.  Ask your mom or dad to print it out for you and don’t forget to say “please” and “thank you”.

I hope you’ll come back next week when we’ll learn more ballet steps.

See you then.

You can subscribe to my blog if you’d like and your mom and dad say it’s okay.  Just click on the “subscribe” button in the right-hand column near the top of the page and fill out the form.  You’ll get each new blog post right in your email inbox.

xoxoxo,

MilliMouse

(Millicent’s blog is sponsored by the Exercise Equipment Super Store and the Healing Tai Chi Store)

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What is a Pas de Bourrée?

Hi!  Welcome back to my blog, the very first of 2012.

Today we’re going to learn about the ballet step called “pas de bourrée“.

Below is the definition from Vance’s Fantastic Ballet Dictionary:

“One of the simplest connecting steps, used to link other steps in a combination. The commonest form is probably the pas de bourrée dessous. Assume your right foot is in front: left foot on half pointe; step on it and put your weight on it; move the right foot to the side, transfer your weight to it (also in relevé); move the left foot to the front of the right and put your weight on both feet in a plié.”

That’s a very long definition!

Below is a funny drawing of stick figures to show how the step is done:

Maybe this video will help you to better understand the step:

I’m going to go practice pas de bourrée now.

Here is a picture I found for us to color after we practice our new ballet step.

Ask your mom or dad to print out the picture for you.   I know you always remember to say “please” and “thank you”.

I hope you’ll come back next week.

See you then!

You can subscribe to my blog if you’d like and your mom and dad say it’s okay.  Just click on the “subscribe” button in the right-hand column near the top of the page and fill out the form.  You’ll get each new blog post right in your email inbox.

xoxoxo,

MilliMouse

(Millicent’s blog is sponsored by the Exercise Equipment Super Store and the Healing Tai Chi Store)

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2011 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

 

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Syndey Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 19,000 times in 2011. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 7 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.