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What Is a Port de Bras?

 

Hi!  Welcome back to my blog.

Today we’re going to learn about port de bras.

 

The word “port” means to carry and the word “bras”  means arm.  So we can translate port de bras from French to English as “carriage of the arms”.

 

In ballet class, we practice different ways of moving our arms at the barre and in the center of the room.

 

Here is a picture of some ballet students practicing arm positions au milieu (in the center):

 

 

Do you remember what we called the ballet step when you move your foot to the front, side or back without lifting it off the floor?  That’s what the girls are doing in the picture above.

 

If you said “battement tendu”, you are correct.  Hooray!  You’re a star!

 

 

Here is another video for you to watch:

 

Below is a picture for you to color.  As your mom or dad to print it out for you.  Don’t forget to say “thank you”.

 

 

Oops!  Time to go to ballet class. 

See you next week when we’ll talk about the ballet step called “degage”.  I hope you’ll come back.

 

xoxoxo,

MilliMouse

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What is a Releve?

Welcome to my blog!

Today we’re going to talk about a releve (rel-e-vay).

To “releve” means to “rise up” either on the ball of one foot or both feet or on the end of your toes if you are wearing pointe shoes.

Here is a picture of a dancer doing a releve on the balls of her feet:

 

Below is a picture of a ballerina standing on the tips of her toes in pointe shoes.

 

I found a video I thought you’d like to watch:

 

Here is a picture for you to color.  Ask your mom or dad to print out the picture for you.  Don’t forget to say “thank you”.

 

 

I hope you’ll come back next week.  We’ll learn about port de bras (por-de-braws)

xoxoxo,

MilliMouse

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Battement Tendu

Welcome back to my blog.

 

Today we’re going to talk about what a “battement tendu” is and how to do it.

Yikes, those are big words!  They are French words.  All ballet terms are in French (later, we’ll talk about why they are always in French).

 

The word “battement” (bat-maw) means “to kick”.

Battement tendu (ton-doo) means to kick without lifting your foot off the floor.

 

Here is a picture of a girl doing a battement tendu in different directions:

 

The girl in the picture above is doing a battement tendu to the back in the first picture (on the left).  In the second picture (in the middle) she is doing a battement tendu to the side.  In the last postion, she is sliding her foot out to the front.

 

Here is a ballet video for you to watch:

 

Below is a picture for you to color.  Ask your mom or dad to print it out for you.  Don’t forget to say “thank you”.

Next week we’re going to talk about releves (rel-e-vays).

 

I hope you can come back.


 

xoxoxo,

MilliMouse

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Fifth Position in Ballet

 

Hi!  Welcome back to my blog.

 

This week we’re going to learn about the fifth position in ballet for feet and arms. 

 

Here’s a picture of a girl with her arms in fifth position.

The first picture (on the left) shows how NOT to hold your arms in fifth position.  The arms are bent way too much.

In the second picture (the one in the middle), the ballerina‘s arms are too straight.  Ugh!

In the third picture the ballerina is holding her arms just right.  They are curved but not bent.

 

Below is a picture of a dancer standing in the fifth position:

 

 

Here is a video that is fun to watch.  It shows different exercises from a ballet class.   The man and woman are professional dancers.  I hope I can dance like that when I get older!

 

Below is a picture for you to color.  Ask your mom or dad to help you print out the picture.  Don’t forget to say “thank you”.

 

Next week we’re going to learn about the ballet movement called “Battement Tendu”.

I hope you will come back next week.

 

xoxoxo,

MilliMouse